Who is CEVR?

About CEVR

Founded in January 2006 by Peter Neumann, ScD and Joshua Cohen, PhD, the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health (CEVR) analyzes the benefits, risks and costs of strategies to improve health and health care.  CEVR undertakes projects to determine the cost-effectiveness of health care interventions, advances methods development, and helps train the next generation of practitioners. We also seek to inform national clinical and public health policy issues. Finally, CEVR has developed and maintains two internationally-known databases that are indispensable resources for health care stakeholders: the Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the National Coverage Determinations Database.

CEVR conducts customized analyses for government agencies, private foundations and industry groups. In all our work, we maintain our research independence and freedom to publish. 

CEVR Team

Principal Investigator

Peter NeumannPeter J. Neumann, Sc.D., is Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health at the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center, and Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine.  Prior to joining Tufts, he was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health.  His research focuses on the use of comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness analysis in health care decision making.  He is the founder and director of the Cost-Effectiveness Registry, a comprehensive database of cost-effectiveness analyses in health care.  Dr. Neumann has written widely on the role of clinical and economic evidence in pharmaceutical decision making and on regulatory and reimbursement issues in health care.  He served as co-chair of the 2nd Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine.  He is the author or co-author of over 250 papers in the medical literature, the author of Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis to Improve Health Care (Oxford University Press, 2005) and co-editor of Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, 2nd Edition (Oxford University Press, 2016).  Dr. Neumann has served as President of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), and as a trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making.  He is a member of the editorial advisory boards of Health Affairs and Value in Health and serves on many advisory boards, including advisory boards for the Congressional Budget Office and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.   He has also held several policy positions in Washington, including Special Assistant to the Administrator at the Health Care Financing Administration.  He received his doctorate in health policy and management from Harvard University.

Joshua CohenJosh Cohen, PhD, is a Research Associate Professor of Medicine at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, and Deputy Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. His research focuses on the application of decision analytic techniques to public health risk management problems with an emphasis on quantifying the risks, benefits, and costs of public health interventions. Past work has involved evaluations of measures to alter population fish consumption, the use of cell phones while driving, and alternative propulsion technologies for transit buses. Dr. Cohen’s most recent work has involved evaluations of the cost-saving potential of preventive health measures, potential gains from reallocating Medicare spending, and cardiac risk screening strategies for children who are candidates for stimulant medications to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Dr. Cohen has served on several National Academy of Sciences committees, most recently to evaluate US EPA’s methodology for estimating environmental health risks, and on the Massachusetts Department of Education panel that guided revisions to the state’s elementary and secondary school math curriculum framework. Dr. Cohen received both his PhD in decision sciences and his BA in applied mathematics from Harvard University.

 

Jordan AndersonJordan’s research interests include the allocation of resources for health services in low income countries and the improvement of value frameworks to better evaluate the value of prescription drugs in the United States. She graduated from Tufts University with a BA in Economics.

 

Brittany D'CruzBrittany is currently involved in projects focused on the inclusion of family spillover in cost-effectiveness analyses. She graduated from Dickinson College with a BA in Psychology.

 

James ChambersJames D. Chambers, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies. Dr. Chambers' research interests include the use of cost-effectiveness evidence in US health care and how evidence is used in coverage and reimbursement policy for medical technology. He graduated from Queens University in Belfast with an MPharm degree, the University of York with an MSC in health economics, and Brunel University with a PhD in health economics.

 

Dan GreenbergDan Greenberg is an Associate Professor and Chairman of the Department of Health Systems Management at the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Guilford-Glaser Faculty of Business and Management at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel, where he teaches on comparative healthcare systems, health technology assessment, and economic evaluation of technologies in healthcare. Since 2008, he is also affiliated with the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health (CEVR) at The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, and is an adjunct faculty at the Tufts University School of Medicine.

During 2001-2004 Dr. Greenberg completed a 3-year post-doctoral research fellowship at the Harvard Clinical Research Institute & Cardiovascular Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Harvard Medical School, initially as a Fulbright Scholar, and was a Visiting Scientist at the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on economic evaluation of healthcare technologies, health technology policy, medical decision-making and outcomes research. He has conducted economic evaluations for various medical interventions and contributed to the literature on the willingness to pay for cardiovascular interventions, diffusion of innovations, and the use of economic evaluations for coverage and reimbursement decisions at the national level. Dr. Greenberg authored or co-authored over 50 papers and book chapters and published his work in leading medical and health policy journals, such as the British Medical Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Health Affairs, and Value in Health.

Dan is a co-founder and the former President of the Israeli Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR-Israel), and is currently co-editor of Value in Health, the official journal of ISPOR. Dr. Greenberg received his doctorate degree from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 2001.

 

David KimDavid D. Kim, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies. His research focuses on using cost-effectiveness analysis in health policy decision-making, developing models to evaluate the economic value of health policy and medical interventions, and improving research prioritization using a value of information analysis. His previous work includes evaluating cost-effectiveness of medical interventions, such as bariatric surgery, hepatitis c screening, and treatment in Egypt, glaucoma medications, diabetic macular edema treatment. Also, he was a lead author of the worked example included in the recently updated textbook, Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, second edition. David received his doctorate in Health Services with a concentration in Health Economics from the University of Washington in 2016 and his MS in Biostatistics from the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

Julie LannonJulie Lannon, BS is a project coordinator at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Her responsibilities include providing managerial and administrative oversight for the Center's varied projects, coordinating grants and contract set ups, and implementing the Center's outreach and fundraising initiatives. She graduated from Simmons College with a BS in biology and a minor in education.

  

Julie LannonTara Lavelle, PhD, is an Investigator at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health and Assistant Professor at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies. Her research focusing on advancing the use of comparative and cost-effectiveness research in vulnerable populations, including children. Previous work includes the development of novel methods for evaluating health and economic outcomes of childhood illness, and assessing preference-based quality of life outcomes in caregivers. Tara earned her PhD in Health Policy with a concentration in Decision Science from Harvard University in 2012 and was previously a postdoctoral research fellow in the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit in the Division of General Pediatrics at the University of Michigan.

Julie LannonPei-Jung Lin, PhD, is a Project Director at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health and an Assistant Professor at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies. Her research focuses on analyzing health and economic outcomes of individuals with chronic conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and diabetes) using large databases. Dr. Lin received her doctorate in health policy and management from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her MS in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health.

 

Natalia OlchanskiNatalia Olchanski,MS, is a Project Director with Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Her research includes cost-effectiveness analysis and decision modeling, as well as analysis of clinical and administrative data sets, such as Medicare, private payer, and CDC survey data. She holds a MS degree in operations research and industrial engineering from Columbia University and SB in mathematics and management science from MIT.

 

Natalia OlchanskiElle’s research focuses on the use of cost-effectiveness evidence and health utility measurements within US health care. Elle received her MPH from Boston University School of Public health.

Eileen SandbergEileen Sandberg, PhD is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Dr. Sandberg's research interests include economic evaluations in clinical areas, such as chronic diseases and childhood health interventions. She received her doctorate in health policy from Harvard University, her MBA from Boston University, and her BA in biology from the University of Chicago.

 

Colby WilkinsonColby’s areas of research include factors driving private payer coverage of pharmaceuticals, prescription opioid abuse and the influence of cost and health benefit timing on value assessment. Colby attended Tufts University, where he received a dual degree in Quantitative Economics and Community Health.

 

Caroline FonsecaCaroline’s role provides support to facilitate CEVR meetings, seminars, and conferences, as well as essential office management functions. Caroline received her dual BA in Theatre and Film Studies at Smith College, and her MSc in Film Studies at the University of Edinburgh.

 

Ashley LeechAshley recently completed her PhD in Health Services Research from Boston University’s School of Public Health. Her doctoral research focused on evaluating the cost effectiveness of risk reductive interventions for HIV couples seeking conception and ways to improve access to care for this population. At CEVR Ashley is focused on cost effectiveness methodology for healthcare prioritization and to improve resource efficiency, and is currently working on examining caregiver spillover effects in cost effectiveness analyses and on the evolution of cost-effectiveness thresholds in published cost-per-DALY studies.

 

Babak MohitBabak completed his BS at the University of Pittsburgh, and an MPH and MBA at the University of Florida. He then worked for several years with the World Health Organization, before completing his doctorate in public health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His doctoral dissertation and first post-doctoral fellowship at Columbia University focused on the cost-effectiveness of social interventions. At CEVR he focuses on clinical cost-effectiveness studies and has an interest in the cost-effectiveness of sleep.