Who is CEVR?

About CEVR

Founded in January 2006 by Peter Neumann, ScD and Joshua Cohen, PhD, the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health (CEVR) analyzes the benefits, risks and costs of strategies to improve health and health care.  CEVR undertakes projects to determine the cost-effectiveness of health care interventions, advances methods development, and helps train the next generation of practitioners. We also seek to inform national clinical and public health policy issues. Finally, CEVR has developed and maintains two internationally-known databases that are indispensable resources for health care stakeholders: the Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the National Coverage Determinations Database.

CEVR conducts customized analyses for government agencies, private foundations and industry groups. In all our work, we maintain our research independence and freedom to publish. 

CEVR Team

Principal Investigator

Peter NeumannPeter J. Neumann, ScD, is Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health at the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center, and Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. Prior to joining Tufts, he was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health for ten years, most recently as Associate Professor of Policy and Decision Sciences. His research focuses on the use of cost-effectiveness analysis in health care decision making. He has conducted numerous economic evaluations of medical technologies, including evaluations of treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. He is the founder and director of the Cost-Effectiveness Registry (www.cearegistry.org), a comprehensive database of cost-effectiveness analyses in health care. Dr. Neumann has contributed to the literature on the use of willingness to pay and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) in valuing health benefits. His other research has focused on the Food and Drug Administration's regulation of health economic information, and the role of clinical and economic evidence in informing public and private sector health care decisions, including those made by the Medicare program. He is the author or co-author of over 150 papers in the medical literature, and the author of Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis to Improve Health Care (Oxford University Press, 2005). He is a member of the editorial boards of Health Affairs and Value in Health. Dr. Neumann has served as President of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), and as a trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making. He has also held several policy positions in Washington, including Special Assistant to the Administrator at the Health Care Financing Administration. He received his doctorate in health policy and management from the Harvard University.

Joshua CohenJosh Cohen, PhD, is a Research Associate Professor of Medicine at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, and Deputy Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. His research focuses on the application of decision analytic techniques to public health risk management problems with an emphasis on quantifying the risks, benefits, and costs of public health interventions. Past work has involved evaluations of measures to alter population fish consumption, the use of cell phones while driving, and alternative propulsion technologies for transit buses. Dr. Cohen’s most recent work has involved evaluations of the cost-saving potential of preventive health measures, potential gains from reallocating Medicare spending, and cardiac risk screening strategies for children who are candidates for stimulant medications to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Dr. Cohen has served on several National Academy of Sciences committees, most recently to evaluate US EPA’s methodology for estimating environmental health risks, and on the Massachusetts Department of Education panel that guided revisions to the state’s elementary and secondary school math curriculum framework. Dr. Cohen received both his PhD in decision sciences and his BA in applied mathematics from Harvard University.

Brittany D'Cruz, BA
Research Assistant

 

James ChambersJames D. Chambers, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies. Dr. Chambers' research interests include the use of cost-effectiveness evidence in US health care and how evidence is used in coverage and reimbursement policy for medical technology. He graduated from Queens University in Belfast with an MPharm degree, the University of York with an MSC in health economics, and Brunel University with a PhD in health economics.

Dan GreenbergDan Greenberg is an Associate Professor and Chairman of the Department of Health Systems Management at the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Guilford-Glaser Faculty of Business and Management at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel, where he teaches on comparative healthcare systems, health technology assessment, and economic evaluation of technologies in healthcare. Since 2008, he is also affiliated with the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health (CEVR) at The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, and is an adjunct faculty at the Tufts University School of Medicine.

During 2001-2004 Dr. Greenberg completed a 3-year post-doctoral research fellowship at the Harvard Clinical Research Institute & Cardiovascular Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Harvard Medical School, initially as a Fulbright Scholar, and was a Visiting Scientist at the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on economic evaluation of healthcare technologies, health technology policy, medical decision-making and outcomes research. He has conducted economic evaluations for various medical interventions and contributed to the literature on the willingness to pay for cardiovascular interventions, diffusion of innovations, and the use of economic evaluations for coverage and reimbursement decisions at the national level. Dr. Greenberg authored or co-authored over 50 papers and book chapters and published his work in leading medical and health policy journals, such as the British Medical Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Health Affairs, and Value in Health.

Dan is a co-founder and the former President of the Israeli Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR-Israel), and is currently co-editor of Value in Health, the official journal of ISPOR. Dr. Greenberg received his doctorate degree from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 2001.

Julie LannonJulie Lannon, BS is a project coordinator at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Her responsibilities include providing managerial and administrative oversight for the Center's varied projects, coordinating grants and contract set ups, and implementing the Center's outreach and fundraising initiatives. She graduated from Simmons College with a BS in biology and a minor in education.

Pei-Jung LinPei-Jung Lin, PhD, is a Project Director at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health and an Assistant Professor at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies. Her research focuses on analyzing health and economic outcomes of individuals with chronic conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and diabetes) using large databases. Dr. Lin received her doctorate in health policy and management from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her MS in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Natalia OlchanskiNatalia Olchanski,MS, is a Project Director with Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Her research includes cost-effectiveness analysis and decision modeling, as well as analysis of clinical and administrative data sets, such as Medicare, private payer, and CDC survey data. She holds a MS degree in operations research and industrial engineering from Columbia University and SB in mathematics and management science from MIT.


Elle Pope, BA
Research Assistant
 

Eileen SandbergEileen Sandberg, PhD is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Dr. Sandberg's research interests include economic evaluations in clinical areas, such as chronic diseases and childhood health interventions. She received her doctorate in health policy from Harvard University, her MBA from Boston University, and her BA in biology from the University of Chicago.

 

Teja ThoratTeja Thorat, MSc, MPH, is a Research Associate at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Her work involves maintaining the Tufts Medical Center Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Registry and retrospective database analyses to understand the trends in cost-effectiveness literature like innovations in pharmaceuticals over time. She received her MPH from Brown University.

Colby Wilkinson, BA
Research Assistant

 

 

CEA Registry Reviewers

Mrs. Tobias is a doctoral student at the Harvard School of Public Health, earning dual degrees in both epidemiology and nutrition. Her current research topics include associations between diet and physical activity, with obesity-related chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and hypertension. Prior to graduate school, Deirdre worked as a research analyst for a healthcare consulting group, where she conducted systematic reviews and meta-analyses for publication on a wide variety of surgical devices and techniques, including bariatric surgery and orthopedics. Deirdre received her B.S. from the College of the Holy Cross in psychology and premedical studies.

Kristina Chen is an associate at Analysis Group, Inc. She has a broad range of research experience through her work as a health economics consultant. Disease areas that she has worked with include diabetes, hypertension, oncology (renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and hepatic cell carcinoma), multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis, rheumatology, and psoriasis. Types of work include retrospective studies using large managed care claims data, patient chart review, patient survey, cost-effectiveness and budget impact models, and various AMCP dossiers. Her primary research interest includes cost-effectiveness and comparative effectiveness research in different disease conditions. She has presented in various professional organizations such as ISPOR, ADA, EASD, and SMDM and published in peer-reviewed journals such as JMCP, Value in Health, and CMRO. She has a Pharm.D. from the University of Michigan and a M.S. in pharmaceutical economics and policy from the University of Southern California.

Joshua T. Cohen, Ph.D. is Deputy Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health and a Research Associate Professor of Medicine at the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center. His research focuses on the application of decision analytic techniques to public health risk management problems with an emphasis on quantifying the risks, benefits, and costs of public health interventions. This work has included an analysis of the health benefits and net costs of screening programs to identify Alzheimer’s disease patients (in progress), an evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of alternative fuels for urban transit buses taking into account life-cycle technology expenses and pollution-related health impacts, and a cost-effectiveness analysis of a ban on cell phone use while driving. Dr. Cohen recently served on National Academy of Sciences committees charged with evaluating EPA’s risk assessment of dioxin and with reviewing EPA’s risk assessment practices in general. He is currently serving on a Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Panel that is revising the state mathematics curriculum framework. Dr. Cohen received both his Ph.D. in Decision Sciences and his B.A. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University.

Kirsten Hall Long is a Principal and Senior Health Economist at K. Long Consulting, an economic consulting firm to the healthcare industry. Prior to establishing her firm, Dr. Long was a Consultant in the Division of Health Care Policy & Research and an Assistant Professor of Health Services Research at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine where her research and publications focused on measuring the quality and value of health care service delivery. She has also collaborated with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota on the economics of prevention–in particular the cost, cost-effectiveness, and return on investment of interventions to reduce smoking and obesity prevalence. Recent projects include the development of the Minnesota Economic Model of Dementia used to assess the potential cost savings associated with enhanced supportive services for caregivers of Minnesotans with dementia and estimates of the medical costs associated with cognitive decline. Dr. Long is a founding member of national and international health economic and outcomes research organizations and received her masters (1992) and doctoral (1999) degrees in economics (health and labor economic concentrations) from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.

Ilene Hollin is a doctoral student in health economics and policy at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ilene’s research interests include the impact of health economics and policy on clinical decision-making as it affects rare diseases and the development of orphan drugs, as well as decision sciences and informatics. She received her BA in American studies and international and global studies from Brandeis University and her MPH in effectiveness and outcomes research from Columbia University. Prior to beginning her PhD studies, Ilene worked as research manager for the Healthcare Innovation and Technology Lab in New York City, where she oversaw research projects that examined the improvement of healthcare through technology. Other previous work experience includes clinical outcomes research among PICU patients at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, evidence-based practices on the topic of maternal depression at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, and communications strategies for technology-focused businesses at Ruder Finn.

Lynn Huynh is a doctoral student in the department of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her doctoral research focuses on developing discrete event simulation methods that epidemiologists can implement in their research setting to design cost-efficient studies examining patient-reported outcomes without compromising power and study characteristics. The applied methods help epidemiologists to explicitly consider different design parameters and investigate how these decisions influence the study characteristics. Thereby, the applied methods may assist to reduce the multi-dimensionality of decisions in making complex trade-offs. She holds a BA from Harvard University in Chemistry, an MPH (concentration in Epidemiology and Biostatistics) from Bloomberg School of Public Health, and an MBA from Carey Business School. She also has Certificates in Health Finance and Management and Vaccine Science and Policy.

Tiffany Kuo serves as a research reviewer for the CEA Registry.  Her interests reside in public health missions, including health policy, cost-effectiveness and health services research, health systems reform and healthy communities.  Her previous work experiences include working in Purification at Bayer Healthcare, conducting clinical spinal medical device studies at Columbia Presbyterian hospital, and performing market research projects at a healthcare communications company.  She currently works for a healthcare start-up firm developing an online personal health platform.  She graduated with her MPH in Health Policy and Management from Columbia and holds a B.S. in Molecular and Cell Biology from UC Berkeley.

Talar Markossian is assistant professor of Public Health Sciences at Loyola University Chicago. She has a Ph.D. in Health Policy and Administration from the University of Illinois at Chicago and an M.P.H in Health Services Administration from the American University of Beirut. Prior to joining Loyola, she was Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management at Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health at Georgia Southern University. Her research interests are in health outcomes research and economic evaluation of health services programs and policies. The focus of her recent work has been on evaluating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of cancer patient navigation. Cancer patient navigation is a process to guide patients from underserved and ethnic minority origins through the intricacies of the health care system when they receive positive cancer screening. Other recent projects include evaluating disparities in cancer outcomes that are due to race/ethnicity and geographic residency status;
and identifying healthcare system-level factors that are associated with disparities to access cancer care.